Stewart Lee

Thanks to Homer (Simpson) and his circle, my kids learnt a little about a lot. When we took them to see Hamlet they already knew the plot. Similarly, Great Expectations held no surprises and they practically rolled their eyes when we slapped Spinal Tap into the DVD player.
In the eleven years since Luke Kennard won the Eric Gregory Award for The Solex Brothers, he has released five collections
Remember David Bowie but Mark Perryman argues with a purpose A cultural icon passes away and the routine of acres of newsprint
Her new article states: "One of the many appealing things about Nadiya is her solid bedrock of home and family, of traditional
I've just been knocked out by The Incredible Hulk. In more ways than one. Both literally - and that's something for my acting résumé, surely - and metaphorically, by meeting the phenomenon in person and seeing what a nice guy he is.
Comedian Stewart Lee has lambasted right-wing newspapers for their treatment of Jeremy Corbyn in an acerbic parody article
Stewart Lee has joined the fight to protect the BBC - and it seems like pretty much everyone on Twitter agrees. In a column
It's 4pm. I leave work and walk a mile to the station, spend an hour on the world's most uncomfortable train to Bradford
In case you missed this: comedian Stewart Lee takes Ukip expertly to task - particularly deputy leader Paul Nuttall - in
Some artistic revolutions are only recognised in hindsight, some spotted when they're actually happening. Vasari knew he was living through a Renaissance, so did Brian Epstein. As Stewart Lee's 3rd television series comes to an end it's clear to me that nothing less than a one-man revolution in stand-up comedy has occurred.
It's quite obvious that Del Boy's fall through the bar is far more than slapstick. It is one of the most complex and richly persistent gags in world culture - the undermining of the male peacock, the crumpling of male vanity, the puncturing of the deluded male ego: in short, the perennial comedy of the mating game.
As the Edinburgh Festival Fringe programme gets heavier every year, it gets harder and harder to choose who to see. Much
When he's not telling audiences how to attend the Fringe or saturating the TV schedules with his own shows, he's telling comedians how they should be comedians [2]. He has so many rules I just wish he'd write them all down because I'm losing track of what we are allowed to do and not do...
It probably seems a little bit rich for someone who hasn't exactly made it as a stand-up (Hyphen? Space? One word? Who knows?) comedian to be blogging about what they think makes a good stand-up and passing judgement on the subject. But never mind...
Such is the tedium served up these days, making stark the realisation that the bile and satire of 30 years ago has vanished. Watching such inchoate comedy (I'm not sure it's even stand-up) is like having your leg humped by a glove puppet: it's attention grabbing but without the necessary aggression which is key to the best comedy.
Thinking inside the box with the maverick comedian Iconoclast comedian Stewart Lee knows TV's delicate relationship with
I got the chance to speak to Richard about how he uses the internet as a medium for comedy and how it has changed the way people make us laugh.
To save money on paying the police, England and Wales are now blessed with cheaper "Community Support Officers" to back-up the 'real' police. I suspect (with no evidence, m'lud) that these are often wanna policemen and wannabe policewomen with over-developed superiority complexes.
Stewart Lee. There are few names which carry more significance in contemporary British comedy. Not only has Lee worked in
Here's a list. Not a television show of a list but a real list written in real words. The topic? The finest alternative comedy shows ever produced for UK television...that you've never watched.