stress-relief

Some stress is good for us; it keeps us on our toes, allows us to think outside the box and come up with new, innovative ideas on occasion. However, a recent survey on work-related stress, anxiety and depression (the Labour Force Survey 2016) found that the number of days lost in 2016 due to stress-related issues was 11.7 million days, equating to 45% of all working days lost to ill-health.
It's easier said than done. As simple as it sounds, not everybody finds it possible to relax. Chores that still need doing or the murmuring coming from your child's bedroom as they sleep, can be stressful. There are many ways you can learn to relax!
When I shared that I'd been on a ten-day silent meditation course, the most common comment was: “It must have been so hard not to talk for that long!”
Look around your office and you will probably see people bouncing their legs up and down, turning pens over and over in their hands, chewing on things, sucking on their lower lips and pulling bits of their beard out - seemingly completely unconsciously. But why do we fidget, and why do some people do it more than others? And if it really helps to relieve stress, does that mean we should all embrace it?
OK, so let's go right back to the beginning again because it seems despite all the hard work of many upstanding individuals the fact that stress is bad (and I mean really bad), is just not quite sinking in with many people.
Nearly two years ago, I started practising yoga. I intended to write about how it has changed my parenting. On reflection
Who wants to feel angry or upset at work?! Life is hard enough without added stress at work. So, what if you could control
This stigma can arise as early as medical school, fostered by a triad of competitiveness, fear and uncertainty. Students sometimes receive conflicting information about mental health, and may fear disclosing illness.
We're bombarded with information during our waking hours, and most of it is unsavoury, antagonistic and reactionary. By closing your eyes for twenty minutes, twice a day, with no distractions you'll find that the silence is a powerful way to filter out meaningless codswallop and a great way to help you think of new ideas and prioritise the things in life that really matter
My personal experience, as one who is not yet fully Teflon-coated (but working at it), is that the problem is me. Yeah, that Simon fellow with all his habituated ways and distorted perceptions. I can only experience the non-stick quality, the non-material spaciousness of the innate mind, when I've dropped the concept of me.