stripping

Can stripping ever be a feminist act? In the first of our Great Debates on The Huffington Post UK, you can read both sides
In the vast majority of cases it is women who strip and men who watch and pay - and it doesn't help the feminist cause because it reinforces sexual objectification of women in three important ways.
It's taken me a while to own that not only am I a feminist now, but I always have been, even when I was a stripper. And for me, being a feminist is about not apologising for the decisions I make or made about the ways I choose to use my body and see myself as a woman in this world.
Ever wanted to sing cheesy songs while women remove clothes beside you? Well, today is your lucky day then, because 'Stripperaoke
I have often felt anger at judgments made toward strippers or nude models or porn actresses. The people who argue that what "those" women do is wrong, but that what Sports Illustrated models or fashion magazine cover girls do is acceptable. Who is to say which does more harm?
When I was 18, I faced a money dilemma and ended up choosing stripping in New York City in places like Scores and Flashdancers over selling shoes. And while I did make some good cash, I had mixed feelings about what I was doing too.
It tells you something about the human condition that as the alleged festival of family unity and general goodwill lurches into view people feel compelled to stay out later, drink more, spend money they haven't got and form inadvisable relationships.
I know you'll have heard in the news about women stripping/posing/glamour modelling their way through university and how this makes them "empowered women". I also believe that in your private moments, unfilled with noise and devoid of delusions, you know this is wrong.
The UK boss of one of the biggest strip clubs in the country has said that students should strip to help them pay their tuition fees.
John Specht, UK vice-president of lap-dancing chain Spearmint Rhino, has hit out at the media for manipulating the comments