student news

Lots of people assume that getting the best marks leads to going to the best universities, and from there to the best jobs
Young voters will determine the outcome of the EU referendum. Remain campaigners know this and spent last week trying to enthuse young voters, get them registered and, eventually, into voting booths. But their attempts to connect with my generation are failing; unless Remain rethinks its approach, they risk handing victory to the Brexiteers.
When I was teaching in the USA, the message I picked up was that networking is a kind of vitamin for careers: vitamin R, where
Depression isn't something to be ashamed about, it's something that should be talked about. Perhaps we could all take a moment to offer some support to a friend or family member who we know has struggles. Reminding them they're loved and not broken or horrible can make such a huge difference!
No-one in this discussion is honestly questioning anyone's "right" to hold such views - they are simply pointing out the ramifications of doing so. "No platform" calls - when actually made - are often taken by those who already feel marginalised and want to kick back against that which they consider to be a negative or oppressive force.
These three messages - recognising people as individuals (rather than positions or functions), trying to understand them (instead of judging them) and separating the personal from the professional - are very much worth bearing in mind if you are seeking success in your career.
It is a well known fact that the human brain has the ability to make an assessment about someone within the first three seconds of a meeting. Most of the time this happens without us being aware of that. People living amongst large number of other human beings, some of whom are far from nice and pleasant, have to be able to do so as a matter of survival.
For most universities and colleges, the season of good will lasts the entire year, every year - or at least, that is the idea. It is called the university's Third Mission: the self-imposed task to actively contribute positively to society.
When it comes to university, there are two opposite lines of thinking. The first is that a university education is highly overrated - some people would advise you not to bother. Instead, just follow your own passion. This view is expressed seriously by very senior and successful people.
Education - and, more precisely, work-integrated education - has an important role in reducing the chances of that happening. The right career path will boost the quality of one's life and also the quality of work because employees who are happy with their work are likely also to be much better at it. In the end, it's a win-win situation.