syria chemical weapons

It simply means that there is always a risk that the updated Russian administration might not be as accommodating to Assad as the current one, especially if the U.S. agrees to Moscow's conditions in Syria, which must be different than merely keeping Assad in power. Tillerson's visit to Moscow is probably aimed at finding out about these prospects personally from the Russian elites.
Syria's quite a large country; how are we going to sustain a campaign fighting on several fronts? If we are going up against the Syrian government AND Islamic State we would need quite a lot of soldiers on the ground...
More recently, and in relation to Syria, it was discovered that between 2004 and 2010, Britain had issued five licences for the export of sodium fluoride which can be used to make sarin, the most potent of nerve agents, used in the chemical weapons attacks in Syria in 2013. Further such licences were granted in 2012.
Western foreign policy vis-à-vis Iraq & Syria is an incoherent and ineffective mess. It is becoming painfully obvious that the lazily sporadic Western/coalition air strikes in the two countries, particularly in Iraq, are proving ineffective at pushing back ISIS, let alone defeating it.
"I once identified a BM-30 Smirch Cluster rocket using holiday snaps" Many of his days are spent wading knee-deep in the
The last thing I expected on my latest trip to Syria at the very beginning of 2014 was to be able to eat a bowl of fetteh in Abu Salim's restaurant in Najjiyeh, in territory controlled by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).
It's easy to say you want a world without nuclear weapons. Nearly everyone does: even David Cameron. It's like saying there should be no global poverty: the hard part is taking action to do something about it.
Children are being deliberately targeted by snipers in Syria, with more than 11,000 killed in the brutal conflict, a new
The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Awarding the prestigious
The Nobel Peace Prize may not be going to Malala Yousafzai, the schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban, but to an international