syria intervention

History may well remember President Trump's decision last night as a critical juncture in Syria's tragedy. But without a comprehensive strategy to curtail Assad's crimes and bring peace, then stability, and in time justice to Syria one night of limited airstrikes will hang in history as an empty gesture that failed to save lives and hampered global efforts to build legitimate and lasting multilateral mechanisms for civilian protection and atrocity prevention.
If any region is familiar with the debilitating effects of political corruption, it's the Middle East. And the notion of a 'power-vacuum' is central, in a struggle to come to terms with the recent bloodshed in Paris.
We haven't heard much about rogue states since George W Bush's tenure in the White House ended, but maybe the term should be revived and applied to one of America's closest allies - Saudi Arabia.
The Islamic State is a hideous organisation. That is well known to all but the most blinkered and casual of observers. The Syrian and Iraqi peoples have suffered under the heel of its potentates and acolytes for months, even years.
Barack Obama’s decision not to launch air strikes against Syria last year was influenced by the shock vote in the British
In a desire to suppress 'fascism' or 'radical evil' in Syria, many liberals are willing to succumb to Obama's whims, even in the knowledge that the chemical weapons rhetoric is bogus.
We all feel pain when we see the pictures of the gassed children in Syria. We all want the civil war in Syria to end soon; this terrible war that has already been going on for two years, has forced millions to flee and has killed over a hundred thousand people.
Mixing moral case with geo-power turned out a toxic cocktail. The world cannot stand by as a brutal dictator gasses or violates his own people - in Syria or Chile. Neither it should stand for a toxic policy of military intervention.
As the drums of war beat once more for yet another strike on a Middle Eastern capital, one cannot help but be reminded of similar events exactly a decade ago that heralded the US invasion of Iraq. However, this time we have learnt from experience to ask the right questions and not to repeat the same mistakes... Haven't we?
Last Thursday, the House of Commons defeated the government motion to use force '"if necessary" by 285 votes to 272 in light of the government's belief that the Assad regime used chemical weapons against its own people. From across the political spectrum, yesterday was heralded as a wonderful day for parliament.