syrian refugee crisis

As tragedy after tragedy unfolds on our own doorstep here in the UK it becomes a little easier for me to imagine the kind of horror people fleeing war have experienced - the horror they are running from and the horrors they have seen while trying to get their families to safety.
Today is World Refugee Day, yet for the 65.3million people across the world currently displaced today is no different from any other day. Fareed means "alone" in Arabic, but together we can stand in solidarity with refugees across the world, not only today, but every day.
Now that the EU-Turkey deal has been reached, the utmost care should be given to its implementation in order to dispel a number of serious concerns that the deal elicits from a human rights perspective.
They deserve a better future wherever they are in exile and more importantly, prospects for a more peaceful future in their homeland. The international community must keep up the momentum after this conference and do everything they can to pursue a lasting political solution.
Civil society organisations, both regional and Syrian, need to be empowered and strengthened to respond to the vast needs. They are on the front lines responding to the crisis and will be there long after Syria fades from the headlines. The world must act now for Syria.
On Sunday an 'unnamed toddler' became the first casualty of the refugee crisis in 2016. Amongst the woozy hangover from a merry old Christmas, a child - dead. Maybe while the music was playing, the crackers were pulled and the booze was drunk, we forgot. Forgot that the refugee crisis did not just stop over Christmas.
People always ask me how I can work on violence against women? "Isn't is depressing?" they say. On my way to South Africa last week for the Sexual Violence Research Initiative Forum - the largest international conference on violence against women and girls in the Global South - the flight attendant said to me, "Don't you find it overwhelming?" For me, I wonder how I could not work on this issue.
I am currently in a hotel in Bitez, a small town just outside of Bodrum in Turkey. I am staying at a lovely hotel called
Solidarity from residents to refugees cannot be a short-lived lust affair. We must take advantage of this current momentum to organise in the long-term. Our efforts must become better structured, more mature and more deeply ingrained into our communities.
We have a lot in common with refugees. Who among us wouldn't flee if faced with war and persecution, and try to start a new life in a safe country which provides opportunities to flourish? Our common humanity both obliges us to make room for refugees, and gives us a way to understand them.