talent

It was a long summer of discontent for universities, who took a pummelling from Fleet Street and various lords a leaping. But now they are back to the serious job of educating people for a rapidly-changing world. Most commentators are clear about the trajectory and drivers of these changes, but not the speed.
It took me a year of soul searching to realise for the last fifteen years I'd done what I thought I was supposed to, what society wanted of me, my family, friends. The last time I'd revelled in what I'd done was at uni - reading novels and analysing them, and before that it was time as a little girl writing fairy stories.
Whether we like it or not, the knowledge economy is real and millennials need to grasp this sooner rather than later.
Get the straight weave, not the braids. Get used to being asked where you're really from. Get used to being seen as an authority
First things first, I never thought about 'diversity' growing up. Not once did I think the colour of my skin, my social class
The question will be how we prepare the workforce for its arrival. Businesses must now equip their staff with the digital tools and expertise they need to keep pace with these technological advances. Employees are looking to their employers to demonstrate responsible and responsive leadership.
It feels that most things are seen through a Brexit lens at the moment. The world has been turned upside down and takes a
The industry is lacking in authenticity. Now, people want to be famous for the sake of being famous even though they don't necessarily have the talent in a particular area, so the world of 'celebrityism' has been filled up with Big Brother winners and X Factor dropouts.
The past run of shows at The Savoy Theatre have been like reading my musical wish list for the West End. It started with
I've just returned from Iceland Airwaves, an international music festival and industry meeting point I've long wanted to