tax dodging

Since the Paradise Papers busted open again the scale of offshore tax avoidance available to the super-rich but not to you and me, one thing has really troubled me. Why have so many shrugged their shoulders at this and seemed to imply that it is fine that the super-rich dodge their taxes using fancy schemes while you and me pay more to fund our schools and hospitals, or receive less well-funded services?
When tax scandals like the Paradise Papers break, the focus, understandably, is on the big names involved. Explainer videos
The British Government currently leads the world on tax and transparency. We were the first major country to introduce a
Tax campaigners turned London's Trafalgar Square into a tax haven in May 2016 On Wednesday the leaders of UK-linked tax havens
In the wake of the EU referendum the UK is revising its relationship with the world. We could use a few friends. Taking on a new role as the torchbearer for global tax reform could win us more than a few.
Today's Anti-Corruption Summit in London is a golden opportunity to deliver on promises the Prime Minister made in 2013, and open up a new era of transparency and openness, with the UK at the forefront. Unfortunately, it looks as though what we will see instead is business as usual...
It's very encouraging that Sadiq Khan has committed to establishing an 'economic fairness' team in City Hall, which will promote the living wage and access to good quality apprenticeships, while also encouraging positive business behaviour. But economic fairness also means ensuring that the huge wealth of London is used in an equitable way to reduce poverty and support long-term, sustainable opportunities for everyone living and working here.
Bangladesh lost around US$14.5 million as a result of a single clause in its UK tax treaty in 2013. That's enough to pay the salaries of up to 18,000 new teachers in a country where more than 4 in 10 girls are not in secondary school.
The Malawi Government desperately needs money to tackle poverty. Yet a 1955 tax treaty with the UK is tying their hands and making it nearly impossible to collect tax from UK companies operating there. The tax treaty is so old that it was signed by the British Governor on behalf of the British colonies of Southern Rhodesia, Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland.
Three of the world's biggest oil and gas companies - Shell, Total and ENI - were granted an extraordinary series of tax breaks worth a staggering US$3.3billion in Nigeria, a country where millions of people live in extreme poverty.