tax justice

They say that a week is a long time in politics. But recently it feels like a day is enough to change almost anything. And if it is true that a political week is a long time, then right now a year feels like a very very long time indeed.
A year on from the scandal of the Panama Papers and in the new reality of Brexit, the UK is thinking about its 'Global Britain' role in the world. The UK must continue to lead on transparency and anti-corruption issues. The first step in this should be committing that all of our Overseas Territories will have the same level of transparency as the UK, and within the lifetime of this Parliament.
The new UK Prime Minister Theresa May set out her stall early, promising on the steps of Downing Street that her tax policy would "prioritise not the wealthy, but you" and pledging that "we have decided to do more to stop aggressive tax avoidance and to fight corruption". It all sounds very promising, but success will depend on how she puts her words into action. Ahead of her speech to Conservative Party Conference we look at what she can do...
Parliament will be standing up for fair taxes. For all companies to pay responsible tax and to play by the same set of rules. If Parliament steps up, we won't be the last country to do so. But the UK will be at the front of the pack. Right where we should be.
Despite the turmoil, Parliament must set about the business of passing legislation. And just maybe, after a quiet weekend, the Chancellor may surprise us all. Because one bit of unfinished business, where the UK could act decisively, is on multinationals and the taxes they pay.
In 2016 the number of people in Britain forced to rely on foodbanks to feed themselves and their children is legion, as is the number who've been reduced to despair because their benefits have been cut for the most minor of infractions...
Three of the world's biggest oil and gas companies - Shell, Total and ENI - were granted an extraordinary series of tax breaks worth a staggering US$3.3billion in Nigeria, a country where millions of people live in extreme poverty.
A just and global solution to the problems of international taxation is required if developing countries are to realise economic self-sufficiency. But if developing countries cannot have a meaningful voice in global tax rules, then they have every justification for going their own way.
Tax avoidance can also be illegal. Hence you can be found guilty of tax avoidance if it is ruled that the methods you used were actually illegal, even though the intention of the tax(non)payer was not to break the law. ..
Over the last year corporation tax has surged up the political agenda. Partly due to grandstanding by the public affairs committee, and partly due to an increased public appetite for tax justice in the present austerity context...