tax reform

The progressive activists, ignited by the Democratic Senate win in Alabama, trained their efforts on Republican swing votes.
The new UK Prime Minister Theresa May set out her stall early, promising on the steps of Downing Street that her tax policy would "prioritise not the wealthy, but you" and pledging that "we have decided to do more to stop aggressive tax avoidance and to fight corruption". It all sounds very promising, but success will depend on how she puts her words into action. Ahead of her speech to Conservative Party Conference we look at what she can do...
If Justine Greening was to change the UK's position on a global tax body, it would not only increase the chances of a successful agreement at Addis, but also generate a huge amount of goodwill which she could use to ensure greater progress on the UK's other priorities, such as gender equality.
The revaluation of a flat tax rate should be considered and implemented upon consideration of how the implementation's effects would benefit the UK, with the inconveniences of the system being amendable within a time frame of five to ten years.
There won't be an end to political gridlock yet, there's just a movement of the chokepoint from the Senate to Obama's veto. People were very frustrated that nothing got done in Washington the last couple of years, but they should not count on DC becoming a smooth, tough, lean and mean operator just because of one election. Some market friendly decisions now have a better chance of being taken, but politics in general in America will not begin to work better overnight.
A recently launched report, Moving Money: International Financial Flows, Taxes, and Money Laundering, has provided a powerful answer to the critics of offshore financial centres, and demonstrated the value of having an open global financial market in helping to boost global trade and economic growth.
Britain is open for business, the Government is keen to say, and there are signs over the past few weeks that global firms are indeed looking seriously at entering the door. Yes, the UK offers a business-friendly tax culture. Yes, the workforce is trained and motivated in many areas. But there are complications that could trip up the unwary.