taxation

Dear Chancellor I welcome media reports that you are planning to make intergenerational fairness a key theme of your Budget
The fallout from the 2017 general election continues. Politics seems to be veering off the radar, with the government directionless
Of all the Tory manifesto pledges that are likely to be junked by the new government, the 'dementia tax' pledge on funding care will get some of the biggest cheers.
Tackling intergenerational inequity is the challenge of our times. Economic measures are required urgently to address the housing crisis and develop fairer taxation. But we also need to bring older and younger people together to discuss mutual concerns and provide shared spaces which can promote stronger understanding and trust between people of all ages.
In recent times, I can recall no General Election holding as much importance as this one. This is an election which will define and shape the future of generations to come.
With high levels of debt, high rates of taxation and a desire to avoid another quantitative easing program, the British government must look for other ways of funding itself. An expansion in its own business operations and generating its own income could be the best way, it could also avoid the need for further cuts in government expenditure.
Back in 2010 the coalition government asked Andrew Dilnot to lead a commission on care funding. He duly reported in 2011 with his proposals including a cap on the cost of care. The government - rightly in my opinion - then in 2015 decided not to implement the cap, set at £72,000, and 'postponed' its implementation until 2020.
By all means have a debate on whether we should raise more taxation from income or wealth, but let's do it as part of a debate about government finances. Enough of the dead cats and red herrings! It's time for a new vision for better care and support.
On 8 March the Chancellor must show that he understands both the immediate care crisis and the need for a radical and sustainable long term solution. Older and disabled people and their families and carers have been waiting too long for the answer. Let's hope that their expectations aren't dashed yet again.
A new vision has to win popular support. Universality is key to ensuring buy-in from the whole population and to tackling the unpopular and fragmented local variations that currently exist. Universality is also critical to raising the status of care and caring, and the value placed on care.