telecoms

With the EU lagging behind countries such as South Korea and Japan on measures of connectivity, it is time to act. Even in undisputed global hubs, such as my own home-city of London, there are spots where it is impossible to get a decent mobile signal.
So how do we open the doors wider for more women to take their place in the industry and therefore influence the future? I don't have the absolute answer, but from my experience I have a few nuggets that I keep close in helping me keep on.
They're not in the slightest bit embarrassed about having huge global plans for their own business and believe they, as a nation, are in it together for the long haul. They have a collective social conscience and are determined to ensure India's growth benefits the many not just the few.
It's no secret that the demand for telecoms in India and other parts of the developing world is accelerating fast. According
UK telecoms companies are about to increase their fixed-line phone charges. Ten years ago this would have led to the technological equivalent of riots in the streets. It would have been front page news. But today? Nope. Hardly a squeak.
For the vast majority of people living in the West, when you think about smartphones just two brands immediately spring to mind: Apple and Samsung. But if you live anywhere outside Europe or America, then it's likely that your first thought is not either of these giants, but the Chinese smartphone brand, Xiaomi.
Ten years ago, in October 2004, there were 812m internet users worldwide - 12.7 per cent of the global population. The web had 50m sites; a Harvard student, Mark Zuckerberg, had just started Facebook, and Flickr had just been launched as a chat room for an online multiplayer game with real-time photo sharing.
Thousands of people are finding themselves locked into unsuitable contracts or hit by cancellation fees when they try to switch, mid-contract, in order to get a better service... Frankly, if you're not getting the service you signed up for, why on earth should you keep paying for it?
Bangladesh needs to be open to the world, and in order to be so, it needs to live up to international standards in business and public life. Britain and the EU need to push Bangladesh to meet these standards; our government must make it clear that if the rule of law is not respected, there will be serious consequences.
Phone-hacking is wrong. Theft of private information is wrong. Illegally obtaining confidential personal data is wrong. But such awful behaviour was confined to the activities of a bunch of nasty newspapermen and a handful of unscrupulous private detectives, right? Anyway, it has now all been fully exposed and put a stop to by Lord Justice Leveson's Inquiry and the police investigations into the media, right? Wrong.