the economist

The challenge is getting politicians to show leadership and maximize the benefits for families, communities, and the country. We need to tackle depression with the same vigour and determination we have for balancing the economy or keeping immigrants out of the country.
Just after the results of the Brazilian presidential elections were made public a few days ago, giving current President Dilma Rouseff of the leftist Workers Party a small margin of victory over her opponent Aécio Neves, the British weekly magazine The Economist did what it always does, and came up with one of their worst ever statements.
The decision in the past few weeks of Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney to revise his 'forward guidance' on interest rates has been portrayed as an embarrassing about-turn by some. Others, including Mr Carney himself, have quite plausibly argued that his approach has managed expectations effectively. Thus far the markets, the media and politicians seem inclined to believe him.
Almost half of all jobs could be automated by computers within two decades and "no government is prepared" for the tsunami
People still like to go shopping. They don't even buy all their groceries online, yet in theory most people would probably prefer to have their washing up liquid delivered rather than spending time personally fetching it from the supermarket.
As part of this debate, WaterAid is calling for everyone, everywhere to have access to water and sanitation by 2030. We are delighted to see that there is a growing consensus that these basic essential life saving services are crucial for lifting people out of poverty.
The Easter break provided a good opportunity to catch up on some recent climate stories, but the current messages delivered by the various media and other outlets vary enormously with a bewildering array of assertions and counter claims.
The problem with Self-Improvement is it is all very grown up. I have great admiration for grown up friends and colleagues who read "The Economist" for instance but when I try I start with enthusiasm before grinding to a dead stop after two or three articles.
The way we see technology has changed, but there's no cause for pessimism. Over the past month or so I've read a surprising number of articles wondering if we have seen all there is to see, with regard to the truly great innovative leaps of mankind.
'An Internet Of Airborne Things?