The Observer

Waiting sometimes seems to take forever. And what do we do while waiting for someone or something to happen? Eat, drink, talk, listen to music, watch tv, bite the nails, send messages, get annoyed, pick an argument with someone, stare aimlessly at whatever is in sight - anything to relieve the boredom and frustration.
Comedian Stewart Lee has lambasted right-wing newspapers for their treatment of Jeremy Corbyn in an acerbic parody article
Personal experiences of hipsters are a far cry from Williamsburg, New York but instead it was like watching pockets of East London being swallowed up by a swarm of skinny jean wearing, flat white drinking locusts. As preened men were dubbed "Metrosexuals" and "scallies" evolved into "Chavs"; in my circle "Indie" became "Hipster".
On Sunday, Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair wrote an opinion piece for British newspaper The Observer. In it, he asserts that the wars of the 21st century are "less likely to be the product of extreme political ideology - like those of the 20th century - but they could easily be fought around the questions of cultural or religious difference".
Yesterday's Observer newspaper presented its pick of 2014's arts releases. One they deemed exciting enough to go on the front page header was Azealia Banks' debut studio album.
We all know that today East Europeans do not get a very good press in Britain. Economic difficulties, austerity measures, the rising of anti-EU rhetoric, the electoral context and misleading forecasts in 2004 have combined to create a culture of blame whose victims are now Romanians and Bulgarians.
Earlier this month, Elizabeth Day wrote an article for The Observer about reading stories aloud. She made the interesting
For anyone not yet acquainted with MooreBurchillTransGate (it's catchy!), a summary of the offense taken reads as follows
Burchill is actually quite elegant in her dismantlement of the "vociferous transsexual lobby and their grim groupies". Shame her understanding of such communities amounts to a gross misrepresentation.
Transphobic remarks from Julie Burchill in her Observer piece include talk about having nuts taken off because "its all most of them are fit to do", 'their relationship with their phantom limb" and various references to cutting things off and "expecting" privilege - I can't picture the situation in which the editor thought these were all reasonable, measured and insightful things to say...
I was curious to know what it's like to be a critic at the Fringe. If you watch 10 shows a day how do you stay open minded? Is Twitter and the multi-headed reviewer blog hydra killing the role of the critic, now that everyone's a critic? Why work as a critic in the first place?
A staggering £13tn ($21tn) is being hidden in off-shore accounts away from the prying eyes of taxmen, according to a new
Journalists at the Guardian and Observer newspapers have been asked to consider taking voluntary redundancy after they reported
Scottish first minister Alex Salmond has claimed that his bank account was accessed by The Observer newspaper. Giving evidence
If you're a Tory, the one good thing you can say about the Sunday papers is there aren't any devastating allegations which
Music festivals are everywhere these days - it feels like there's one everywhere you turn. This fact now seems to extend even to the pages of the Observer on a Sunday morning.
John Naughton is a rare and exotic creature. Having just read his bio we seem to share an Irish heritage and as children
The shadow education secretary has said he agrees with more than half of the Government's cuts to school building programmes
I had never heard of anyone having their limbs blown off while trying to buy property until I learned of Tarek Dergoul, the former British Guantánamo Bay detainee.
It's been three days and nights since David Cameron vetoed an EU treaty on rescuing the Eurozone, but that hasn't stopped