third sector

Muslims in the country are 'Britain's top charity givers', giving an average of almost £371 each a year". Prime Minister David Cameron, in his video message to mark the start of Ramadan 2014, said "Here in Britain, Muslims are our biggest donors - they give more to charity than any other faith group."
Disabled people are no longer dependent on the charities, who could now be seen as the Black slave traders of our time. The services they run are now mostly funded by government and are undesirable relics of the past.
The charity sector is taking a bit of a battering at the moment, not least in relation to polarised arguments about pay, but also a lack of professional recognition and poor career paths that can often be criticised for not supporting talent.
The fact that this age group is facing almost unparalleled employment challenges must be linked to their literacy skills; one in five young people are unemployed, whilst the numbers unemployed for two years or more are at a 20 year high.
Funders in the charitable sector give their money to good causes, so it can seem churlish to say that they need to think more about the impact of their giving. But surely this is true. The way in which funders support their chosen cause can mean they have a lesser or greater impact.
The Commission will draw together existing research, engage and consult the sector through a series of events, and work with voluntary organisations to develop answers as to how the sector can lead the way in adapting to an ageing population.
No-one falls to earth as an alcoholic. Everyone who uses alcohol has learnt to do so. I hear stories of people's journeys into addiction and dependence every day. Stories of ordinary people, who we might quite like to spend time with. Each is unique, but there are common threads.
Having spent three years working for a small charity, running a support and signposting service for young people, I decided the time was right to move on. During my final week, one of our volunteers approached and asked (very sweetly and with the best of intentions) "So, is it time to get a real job then?".
We do need better public services - of that there is no doubt. However, I am not convinced that many of the prescriptions in "Better Public Services" will deliver them.
Youth unemployment, the rent crisis and all of the other consequences of the UK's current economic difficulties are complex problems that no one measure can solve. However, good work is being done across the UK to give young people the skills and knowledge they need to cope and to prosper in life.