time to change

One autumn morning, I found myself not able to get up and out of bed and go on my normal commute into London. The feeling I can only describe as like hitting a brick wall and not having the energy to get up and brush myself off. But why was I feeling this way and what could I do about it?
Today's launch highlights that all men should have someone they feel comfortable talking about their feelings with and, where people need NHS help and support, this government is committed to delivering the highest quality mental healthcare.
Adele labelled "Hello" her "make-up record". She said: "I'm making up with myself. Making up for lost time. Making up for everything I ever did and never did". At 21, I'm realising that maybe it's time to make up with myself.
How can we accept a society that does not provide the support needed when traumatised children have been brave enough to come forward - as we encourage them to do. Surely it is our moral duty to offer a safety net of support and recovery services at the other side.
I was officially diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder at the age of 15 although it has been part of my life for a long time, I just didn't have a name for my thoughts and behaviours. It was around this time that I was also diagnosed with depression.
That's why today is so important. It is time to change those attitudes to mental illness and it is time for us to talk to one another about how we are feeling. If we all take the time to talk to a friend or colleague about how we are feeling, or about our experiences of mental illness, we can help change the way two thirds of people are feeling.
It doesn't have to be difficult. It can start with a simple "how are you?" Whether you meet up for a tea or coffee and just have a chat or send someone a message on Facebook, email or twitter, that is all you need to be a good friend and to make a real difference.
#ExploreMH is a series of articles and YouTube videos aimed at breaking down the stigma that surrounds Mental Health. You
Should we campaign for the wider use of Trigger warnings as it would benefit everyone - not just those with a mental health problem? I hope that by openly discussing these points with you, we can together fight the stigma.
Sitting in a board room full of heads of nursing and other patients and their representatives, I felt scared. In fact, I felt very scared. I don't know where my courage came from but I felt I had to speak about what mattered to me. So, I spoke up. It was time to talk.