Tom Grundy

A day after one of Hong Kong's three pro-democracy protest camps was cleared by police and bailiffs, hundreds of pro-democracy activists returned to Mong Kok's main shopping thoroughfare on Thursday evening. Instead of erecting tents, activists convened to collectively watch movie trailers and adverts on a cinema billboard.
Dozens of protesters gathered at the British consulate in Hong Kong on Friday demanding that Britain does more to prevent China influencing elections in the city.
The main Umbrella Movement 'Occupy' site in Hong Kong received an unusual visitor, on Friday, in the form of a Kim Jong-Un impersonator.
There were violent clashes, scuffles and brawls in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong last night as police deployed pepper spray and batons against pro-democracy protesters. Police say 9000 demonstrators were present and 26 people were arrested.
In the run-up to Hong Kong's occupation protests, the initiators of the movement were called "radicals" and "extremists" and their actions dubbed "terrorism". Yet the young people peacefully demonstrating for universal suffrage across the city have won hearts and minds across the world in what amounts to a meticulous reading of peaceful dissent. By putting the "civil" in "civil disobedience", these young protesters have already won an important moral victory, no matter what happens next.
A British activist in Hong Kong has attempted to perform a citizen's arrest on Tony Blair, claiming it was his "moral obligation