Tracey Emin

"I’ve got a reputation for being a party girl anyway, but in this situation the answer is ‘no’ – you set an example, and you live by that example."
She was diagnosed with “really rapid, really aggressive” bladder cancer early last year.
We love change.  And Soho has always changed.  But it has changed because of the diversity of income groups all rubbing along together at once.  And of course we already have one Mayfair.  No one needs another one in the centre of London.
The marriage of Mrs Emin to Reg will give them both support, constancy, experience and the potential to grow further. She is following many famous people who have achieved the same in their relationships with rocks.
The problem with Emin's statements is that they propagate damaging myths: about what it is to be an artist, a mother, a woman. And as Virginia Woolf tells us, it far harder to kill a phantom than a reality. It's like looking for nits, or searching for proof for jealousy: resolution can only be reached by discovering what we don't want to be true and in the absence of that we are condemned to continue the search.
The 20th anniversary exhibition of A Fete Worse Than Death hosted by Red Gallery, is allowing artists the chance to reclaim the area for a day whilst giving the public a rare opportunity to see and buy early artworks made by the YBAs before they were famous.
As you weave between the blooming orange trees, which beguilingly give out an aroma of comforting honey in the spring, in the garden of the grand but homely house of the late great poet and author Robert Graves, you feel he'd achieved what every artist craves - an inspiring base, studio or home where you can create.
Debut Contemporary has become the Arts Hub and Meeting Point in Notting Hill in just three years since its existence. It is a place where you can practise yoga, play chess with gloves, wear a bespoke-made mask, have an Art-inspired dinner and attend a constant array of eclectic events.
It makes sense to exhibit this kind of art in one of Soho's more rebellious corners. The space chosen by Vermilion Hook lies beneath Marshall Street in the basement salon belonging to designer and tailor, Mark Powell.