Trafalgar Studios

The AVM in my head has been treated with radiation and the hope is to obliterate it. If I take Aurelius's view, in the greater scheme of things, and in relation to the bigger picture, it is then a very very very small abnormality indeed. An annoyance.
Golem is a dazzling visual feast with a biting social commentary that's enough to put a spring in the step of even the most jaded theatre-goer. In a show that fuses performance with animation, film and music, Golem challenges us to confront the lie that we've been sold - that technology will set us free.
I have been really struck by the child-like quality of the writing. I remember Ingmar Bergman saying about Strindberg that the key to the plays is their rage. I think this is true. But I also think there is something very fragile in there; an aching vulnerability.
East is East is a bright, well-observed comedy about the issues facing second-generation Pakistani children born and raised in the UK. Starring the gloriously talented Jane Horrocks and writer Ayub Khan-Din, the play has a terrific pace with an excellent balance of humour and pathos to keep you hooked.
I guess it comes down to how you like your Richard III. I prefer mine to be brooding with conspiracy and charisma, for me to be sickened and amused by him in equal measure.
I don't think you could ever witness a better version of Henrik Ibsen's Ghosts than this Richard Eyre-helmed production at the Trafalgar Studios. Genuinely moving but never melodramatic or overwrought, this story of a family trying to escape the ghosts of their past is an exceptional piece of theatre that will resonate long after the curtain falls.
Because it strikes me that we are reaching some sort of tipping point when it comes to gay issues: that on some fundamental level of global consciousness the final battle is being fought between progress and fear.
The cast, also including Mathew Horne as a range of supporting characters, is very strong. Each actor brings great poise and conviction to their performance, wonderfully dramatizing the internal conflicts within their character.
Theatre rage - it happens to the best of us. You may not have experienced it in the stalls of your local ‘am-dram’, but we
Don't mention The Scottish Play. The theatrical superstition to never utter Shakespeare's Macbeth inside a theatre has been