Transform Drug Policy Foundation

Those dying are 'often with poor physical and mental health... losing their battle with long-term addiction'.
2014 was quite the year for drug policy. Whatever your thoughts regarding this global issue, the most important thing was that it really felt like people were talking about it - and more importantly - acting on those words... So much progress has been made, but more is still to be done.
As the government's arbitrary decision to ban Khat still resonates and incongruently flies in the face of evidence, it seems
Oh good, the obligatory news has broken that 'Super Strength Skunk' has invaded the isles and is wreaking havoc on UK shores. For those that work in drug policy, this story is similar to May Day: it comes round annually and leads to all kinds of pageantry - complete with bell ringing and the clashing of batons in a calamitous Morris-style jig.
The time has come to dispense with our dusty 'legalise or not legalise' discussion as this provokes a non-debate and an almost literal fist-fight of a discussion due to its lack of finesse.
The majority of Britons support a softer stance on cannabis laws, according to a survey by an independent think-tank. More
The last time a Royal Commission was called for on drug policy was that of the 9 March 2011; Lord Norton of Louth raised the issue in a question for short debate - the call for an evidence lead policy was to such an extent that the word evidence was used 42 times in only an hour.
Owing to its immeasurable impact there is a special screening: On 11 December, at the prestigious Oval Space, Bethnal Green, The House I Live In will be shown with the accompaniment of a panel discussion complete with the erudite people who are on the frontlines of the drug policy discourse.
Did you see the debate? A debate with a host of celebrities: Russell Brand, Sir Richard Branson; world leaders, and eminent opinion formers. Oh, and Peter Hitchens was in attendance. A debate of such magnitude would surely not creep under the radar? Especially given the gravitas of the contested subject?
Drug policy reform has received many endorsees, from Kofi Annan and Richard Branson, to a fleet of Nobel Prize winners and