Trident Replacement

If the Tories think that a Labour ditching of Trident would make them unelectable, then they really are ignorant to the concerns and interests of ordinary British people.
At the moment we have been told that we need these weapons and that's all, no discussion, no options, no consideration of what we do if there is a proliferation of states increasing their nuclear capabilities, no discussion of the harm they could cause in accidents and no alternative opinions taken seriously.
Ever more frequent extreme weather events and the conclusions of COP21 make ecological responsibility and human stability the world's most pressing concerns. The Green Party needs to evolve to become the leftist force for the common good - there is far too much at stake to do otherwise.
Trident News Rumours are swirling around Britain's Trident renewal project as Parliament prepares for key announcements and
Whichever way you look at it, it seems that the fiscal hawks and disarmament doves have been blown out of the sky and have sunk into a deep blue ocean where the Trident Successor programme stares them head-on.
In my view, those countries with a nuclear deterrent are putting themselves more at risk from today's threats. We're not spending our money wisely. We're taking the heat off those countries without nukes. They're letting us spend the cash on Trident while they focus on what matters: tackling terrorism and stopping the growth of terrorist groups.
National security is deeply linked to the trajectories of nuclear proliferation, arms races and the success of diplomatic efforts to stem the tide. Future British governments would do well to maximise their efforts to develop a globally cooperative approach that undercuts the drivers of proliferation and reduces the salience nuclear weapons have to all states, and maximises the tendency in them all to act in a social responsible manner, with or without nuclear weapons. How they can do this effectively in the coming years must be at the top of their foreign policy agenda.
A Labour government would consider reducing Britain’s nuclear-armed submarine fleet, according to Ed Balls. However, the
This week, I sat in the public gallery of the House of Commons, to watch an Opposition Day debate on the UK's Trident nuclear weapons programme. Sometimes I like to sit in the gallery, instead of watching on TV at home, because it means you get to see lots more fascinating things.
Moving forward, we need to recognise the important role our nuclear deterrent plays internationally. Despite the global security environment having changed markedly since 1940, to abandon our deterrent now would only serve to undermine our own security, the security of our allies and that of liberal democracy globally.
We are beyond the moment in history when upper echelons in government and society can award themselves an absolute right to keep decisions that are taken in the name of the people, from the people. This lesson needs to be learnt across all sections of the establishment and political life.
For governments seeking to strengthen their own agendas it can help to have a minimally informed or, at least, somewhat apathetic electorate. And so important political decisions are often veiled in a cloak of terminology that alienates voters - especially young voters.
The reality is that the UK cannot rely on weapons that were designed for a different world and political context to fight these modern day security threats.
Why are we planning on spending £100 billion to renew a weapon system floating around in submarines off the coast of Scotland when it could completely destroy us and our climate, leaving radiation for years to come? If Britain chooses to renew Trident in 2016, this is ultimately the choice we will make.
A layer of our political elite still thinks that Britain's power and status can be secured by Cold War weapons. But others already understand that the challenges lie in climate change, hunger, injustice - and the asymmetrical warfare in varying forms that those problems will increasingly bring if unresolved. This is where the thinking of our political class needs to be.
It's easy to say you want a world without nuclear weapons. Nearly everyone does: even David Cameron. It's like saying there should be no global poverty: the hard part is taking action to do something about it.
Labour are "open" to cheaper alternatives for the Trident nuclear deterrent but have stopped short of committing to ditch
Many people from across the political spectrum are opening their minds to a reconsideration of Britain's strategic and security needs.
The government today awarded contracts worth £350m to UK companies to design the next generation of nuclear submarines. Most