tv debate

Nicola Sturgeon has pleaded with Ed Miliband to do a deal with the SNP after the election in order to "kick David Cameron
I suspect Thursday wasn't the best day of David Cameron's political life: first the Supreme Court ruled against him on his attempt to block publication of Prince Charles's private letters to government ministers (three cheers for the Supreme Court); then MPs voted against his attempt to change the rules to make it easier to get rid of the Speaker of the House of Commons (three cheers for independent-minded MPs). And then, after supper, Jeremy Paxman gave him a thorough, and distinctly uncomfortable, going over in the TV-debate-that-wasn't (three cheers for Jeremy Paxman). If Samantha was still up when he finally got home, she probably asked him if he's sure he wants the job for another five years.
Ofcom stated that Ukip's electoral performance in the past two European Elections demonstrates that they represent a growing segment of public opinion and that ought to be reflected in their media coverage. The media's own watchdog are, though, modestly underplaying the role that the press can play in influencing public opinion and falsely creating a black and white split between television's role in "reflecting" and "influencing" public opinion.