unemployment rate

The war on the poor aka 'welfare reform' is being waged with that much more ferocity and that much more cynicism in the weeks
People looking for their first job have long had a raw deal in the labour market. The effects of the financial crisis in 2008 meant employers disproportionately scaled back recruitment of entry level jobs and the most recent ONS statistics concerning those Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) say there are still 954,000 young (16 -24) NEETs.
Ordinarily, an impending election would whip politicians into a mad frenzy of desperately trying to rectify such a disaster; then things might actually change. Another good reason for young people to vote.
The shopping is done, the presents are wrapped and plans have been made. Yes, Christmas is just around the corner. And before we know it, we'll be toasting in the New Year. People say things tend to quieten down for businesses around this time of year, but this certainly hasn't been the case in the skills and employment arena. Quite the opposite, in fact.
Unemployment has continued to fall as the claimed economic bounce back saw more UK citizens find work. The latest Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures show the same pattern as the last year, but signs of a slowdown in the number entering work mean the country is not out of the woods yet.
They are more likely to be following the maxim, "Live longer, work longer," but how much work do they actually do? Being "self-employed" may seem preferable to being "retired" and definitely better than "unemployed," even if many of the self-employed are in tiny jobs, working only a few hours a week. In truth, some may be happy with that, but not all are.
Today's official unemployment figures show a familiar pattern to those who watch them regularly.
Millions of people could be without a job or in work they are over-qualified for within the next decade unless action is
The rate of unemployment fell from 6.8% to 6.6% in the last three months, leading to government rejoicing. A rise too in the number of people in work - up 345,000 compared to the previous three months - looks good on the face of it...
When 'official' figures put UK unemployment at a five-year low and the government insist we are in the middle of a 'jobs boom', for those of us who have already had a career, there isn't a bright light at the end of the tunnel.