unemployment rate

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has today announced another fall in unemployment and rise in employment, but recent troubling patterns are continuing. In the three months to March 2014, unemployment fell 133,000 to 2.2 million people, or 6.8% of the working age population...
Imagine if we get just half of the Capital's 33,200 young JSA claimants off benefits and into apprenticeships, it would free up hundreds of millions of pounds to help fund these opportunities, getting our youngsters out of the job centre and into the workplace.
An astonishing 2.7 million people now work in the UK's retail sector, making it by far the biggest 'employer'. Many are employed in local branches of supermarkets where staff numbers have been swelled in recent years by working mums lured by part-time hours and shift work offered.
Unemployment has shown a big fall in the last three months and now stands at 7.1% of the working population. But coverage of the issue has focused on the likely result of this fall on interest rates. Mark Carney, the Governor of the Bank of England, has said he will not raise interest rates, which have been stuck at 0.5% since 2009, until unemployment drops to 7%.
Whether it's experience or proven skills, employers have been setting higher application requirements as to limit the amount of graduates that would be accepted. I would argue that this is also a result of the economic crash.
It seems that now, graduates are bombarded with statistics, figures and dooming projections about graduate employment. Graduate schemes are an excellent way to get your career up and running, but more must be made of more moderate companies offering just as good opportunities.
It's very tempting for those outside the city to view it in terms of its galleries, bistros and tourist traps. For well-salaried young professionals who work in Zone One, it's all too easy to experience London through the prism of a safe middle class bubble, but that experience is not universal.
Today's unemployment numbers are not strong enough to definitely say the recovery is well on its way, but the figures are encouraging.
Women's unemployment is rising to a 25-year high while men's is falling, leading to a "female unfriendly" labour market, according
There may be more of us working, but in real terms we're all working for less. Wages are not growing anywhere near as much as inflation and in fact the most recent data showed they rose at their slowest rate of growth since June 2010.