UNHCR

When World Refugee Day was first introduced by the United Nations in 2000, it was a rare opportunity to raise awareness of the huge challenges facing refugees fleeing from violence, food insecurity and drought - a much needed opportunity to encourage the media to shine a light on the human stories behind the statistics.
By the GEM Report and the UNHCR Education Section Days before the World Humanitarian Summit, we have jointly released a new
If I was cynical I'd remark on the fact that this latest announcement comes just days before a crucial vote in the Commons which would force the Tories to take 3000 vulnerable child refugees from Europe and it seems that the Government are trying to buy off MPs ahead of that. Of course the Government's latest capitulation to take up to 3,000 individuals from the Syrian region over the next four years is welcome but it is simply not enough.
Now that the EU-Turkey deal has been reached, the utmost care should be given to its implementation in order to dispel a number of serious concerns that the deal elicits from a human rights perspective.
In these desperate times, the world needs to do more, generating a sense of hope, security and protection - especially for young children, travelling without parents and leaving everything they know behind.
People will continue to migrate for many years, and it is very important for world leaders to review the old tradition of prevention and protection which was set under the United Nations Higher Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) that were built after World War II. Since then our world had changed a lot, but the approaches have remained the same in the interest of national security. If we do not set out to help refugees and migrants, we have sold our humanity and that is a very worrying phenomenon.
Any organisation that has seen more than 650 of its workers killed or injured on duty in 15 years would need to think hard about how it keeps staff motivated and productive, and how it attracts new talent to replace staff who leave.
Each day, new lives are arriving here in the substitute maternity unit in Za'atari, while hundreds more are being killed every day eight miles away in Syria. We alone can't give the children of Syria what they need the most - ceasefire and peace - but we can protect their lives, their bodies and their minds from further harm and help them survive yet another bitter winter here in the Jordanian desert.
What passes for routine these days means that within an hour the crew on board has spotted, hailed and rescued forty-four men, women and children. All Syrian, all fleeing the war. This summer, across the Greek islands, this is nothing unusual...
Faced with 59.5 million forcibly displaced people also forces the world to reconsider how we position ourselves in creating a future that does not become a holding pattern for misery, but rather a movement where we make the best of what we have.