UNICEF UK

Both in the UK and around the world many children are unable to enjoy their rights. A third of UK children are living in poverty without an adequate standard of living, 30,000 are missing from school, one in five children report that they experience mental health issues, and many more are at risk of neglect and abuse.
The government has admitted no children have come to the UK under the scheme this year.
Senior cross-party politicians have written to Theresa May to ask her to keep the Dubs scheme for child refugees fleeing
This week has brought us the incredible news that The Boy on the Bicycle, a documentary about Syrian refugee children who
There is a saying that goes "when you educate a girl, you educate a nation". And research by Unicef indeed shows that investing in girls and empowering them to reach their full potential is critical for overcoming cycles of intergenerational poverty*. Yet today around the world girls and women still face significant barriers to social and economic empowerment.
We need to change the conversation. We can stop laying the blame for a major public health issue in the laps of individual women, and acknowledge the collective responsibility of us all to remove the barriers to breastfeeding which lead to eight out of ten women reporting they had to stop breastfeeding before they had wanted to.
The UN is predicting that by the end of this year almost 10million people in Iraq will be in urgent need of help... Already, 1.3million children have been torn from their homes and more than three million do not have access to quality education. Children face danger on a daily basis and have witnessed unspeakable cruelties. Girls have fallen victim to enslavement and sexual violence. Children have been used as suicide bombers and as human shields. Most are living without physical protection, psychosocial support, and basic services.
Nufolo was orphaned by HIV and AIDS and was taken in by his aunt. However, instead of entering the loving environment that he craved, Nufolo was treated like a domestic slave and abused.
Surely no-one wants our most vulnerable children to suffer, even in harsh economic times. And they don't need to. Different choices are possible. We know because many other countries have done better. It is possible to reduce child poverty and deprivation even as we take steps to recover from the great recession.
Today, Usain Bolt will compete in the 100m relay for Jamaica in his first ever Commonwealth Games. As the fastest man in the world, he is one of Jamaica's most famous exports, alongside the country's glorious, sun kissed beaches that thousands travel to every year. But my trip to the small island in the Caribbean with UNICEF was to see a very different way of life.
Using the internet to chat with friends or play games online has become just as normal for many children as getting up to go to school. With millions of children browsing the web the questions I suspect many parents will ask themselves are: What does my child do when they go online? Are they browsing web sites I should be concerned about?
The generosity of millions of people has helped make our efforts possible and has brought hope to children who have had to face unimaginable suffering and hardship. We couldn't do it without you. As the card I was given as I left the Philippnes said - thank you to all those who have helped.
On a recent trip to Liberia in West Africa I was shocked to learn that more than 30% of girls aged 15-19 are either married or pregnant, half of these married before their 15th birthday.
First birthdays are meant to be about celebrating; the first milestone in a young life has been reached. But when South Sudan turned one this month the celebrations occurred against a backdrop of continuing strife and suffering for the children of the world's newest nation.
When flash floods hit Wales earlier this month necessitating the evacuation of more than 1,000 people, my thoughts immediately returned to the people I met last month in Cagayan de Oro in the Philippines who had also been affected by flooding. I also reflected on the floods that hit my own constituency, Workington in 2009 and how it shook our community.
With a hunger crisis sweeping across the Sahel affecting eight African countries and putting the fragile existences of a million children in jeopardy now may seem a strange time to be talking about the remarkable progress for the world's poorest children that has been achieved over the past 20 years.