u.s. foreign policy

A year later and the black flags of the Islamic State (formerly ISIS), currently fluttering across lands from from northern Syria to the Iraqi province of Diyala north-east of Baghdad, have once again pushed the noxious issue of intervention to the forefront of the US foreign policy debate - a discourse that is further dividing an already fractured Republican Party, with the question of action versus non-action likely to run all the way to the 2016 election.
In his essential book on UK foreign policy, Web of Deceit: Britain's Real Role in the World, historian Mark Curtis notes
Putting the Miliband saga aside, Brogan's comments on the Cold War deserve close attention. Was the Cold War really a "struggle between freedom and communism?", or is the history of the conflict more complicated?
How many Westgates do we need to realize that US policy in the Horn of Africa is a major contributor to bolstering support for groups like Al-Shabab amongst Somalis and foreign fighters alike?
In a desire to suppress 'fascism' or 'radical evil' in Syria, many liberals are willing to succumb to Obama's whims, even in the knowledge that the chemical weapons rhetoric is bogus.
In the past two years, Western media coverage has focused on the growing popularity of Salafist jihadi groups like the Nusra Front (Jabhat Al-Nusra) in Syria. These groups have become both an argument to intervene militarily, as well as a reason to stay out.
Diverse issues like instability in the Middle East, the financial crisis and climate change, all bear the footprint of the US. It is therefore incontrovertible that if we, here in the UK, wish to genuinely affect such issues, it is in our vital strategic interest to cement the 'special relationship.'
LONDON -- Last October, shortly after midday, Theresa May, Britain's Home Secretary, stood up in the House of Commons and
How can President Obama make good on his campaign promises to strengthen the welfare state, invest in America's crumbling infrastructure and preserve American leadership in world affairs - all in a period of sluggish growth and continued economic uncertainty? The president will have the first of two important opportunities to provide some answers at his inauguration this Sunday.
In this seemingly endless episode of tit-for-tat between Russia and the US, Russian politicians have landed a blow against everyday Russians and Americans - and from it gained very little.