vcs

The Paradise Papers will hopefully lead to Government and international concerted collective government action to close tax havens and tax avoidance routes but meanwhile, as purchasers of services and goods, the public sector should act. And as regards fundraising, so should charities.
There could be strength in and to be gained exploring how to develop a shared and joint approach to shared challenges and issues including social injustice. Has the time come to explore? I think that it has.
Let's hope that charities and others will act and not stand aside. I have confidence that there is an opportunity for social action at a local and national level on an unprecedented scale with the result that there will be change - and that this change will be for the better.
The Prime Minister has appointed John Glen as the new Minister for Civil Society. This a very important role though it has not always had the recognition nor political clout it should have. One hopes that this will change under Mr. Glen's tenure.
The General Election discussion on the role of businesses in the delivery of public services should be welcomed by those
It is both interesting and encouraging that senior politicians have already spoken about public sector outsourcing and contracting
The House of Lords Select report entitled "Stronger Charities for a Stronger Society", which was published earlier this week, provides a huge opportunity for the charity and voluntary and community sector (VCS).
Boards play a vital role in the governance and leadership of organisations, and to ensure that they fulfil their remit, they have to be boards with the energy, courage, purpose and intellect to make a difference. Good argument fuels success. Pitiful avoidance of differences and fear of different views will sink even the strongest organisation.
The next few years are going to be challenging but they offer the opportunity and, I would contend, the necessity for charities and the VCS to go back to basics and the original purpose and press their cause fearlessly.
The current crisis in social care in England (and let's be under no illusions, for 'crisis' is what it is) should come as no surprise. Demand and need for social care, especially but not exclusively, for elderly people, has been rising for many years, and is forecast to grow at accelerating rates for many more years. as it has for younger adults.