Video production

The easier you can make it for people the better, if they can do it by just watching the content and your content is good then the battle is already won. In the past few weeks two online campaigns have executed this perfectly by utilizing two of the most popular things on the Internet: puppies & pornography.
When it comes to video production, advertising, marketing and branding there are certain tropes and ideas that tend to get banded around and eventually overused. Much like in the fashion industry when an idea can be so good and so attention grabbing that it will be lifted from obscurity and the alternative into the moronic ubiquity of the mainstream.
It is Wes Anderson himself who has been a victim of one of a creative highjacking recently by DDB Sydney, for the Australian branch of Expedia. The ad so blatently and unapologetically borrows from Anderson's palette that it ceases to become an advert and more of game to spot which trope of the directors will appear next.
This week I have been made aware of two PSAs. The first and the main subject of this article is from the Ontario Ministry Of Health and deals with that most maligned of habits - smoking - and in particular the somewhat unjustifiable modern trend of 'social smoking'. The second is a film from Serbia highlighting the effects of domestic violence.
Is there any merit to this kind of shock viral advertising? This rather disturbingly titled viral - 'ça sent le sapin' (Smells Like Pine) was removed by Cuisinella themselves who branded it as 'Sick' - not before racking up a few hundred-thousand views and gaining the attention of viral ad fans everywhere though.
It's been a year since YouTube spent $100 million on original content channels in a bid to start television 2.0. The time has come for fresh investment in their plan but this time the gatekeepers of web video are going to be somewhat more surgical with their approach.
Once again its time for the YouTube overlords to move the goalposts ever so slightly just to keep us video creators on our toes. The latest algorithm change might not be popular at first but with time it should make the site a place for quality not quantity.
Here's another intimidating statistic about YouTube: 86,400 videos are uploaded to video every day; that's the equivalent of Hollywood making and releasing 302,400 features every week. Of course the content comes in many forms, which is why some of the web videos get so many hits, the viewers are out there for sure.
This recent development for Facebook is one of many that is turning the website into a real player in the entertainment world. The site recently began a movie rentals service and the latest deal with Spotify could turn Facebook into the online platform for streaming music.