vod

Whether it's Stranger Things on Netflix, news clips on Facebook, or EastEnders on BBC One, in terms of what to watch, we've
The balance of power has already shifted. VoD is a door that won't be slammed shut. The traditional broadcasters have spent the last few years looking down their noses; throwing a few out-of-date series in the direction of VoD. But recently things have changed.
While the outcome doesn't have to be viewed with such a pessimistic slant, it brings up further questions about the ability in our current technological age for companies to pinpoint so specifically what people want before they themselves are even aware they wanted something.
LONDON -- Online video often puts off some UK advertisers because the slots are more expensive than those on conventional
On receiving a Fellowship at the BFI, Al Pacino said: "If you put any movie on a big screen nowadays, I'll love it. I mean, who wants to watch movies on iPhones? I'm so tired of that." I too love a good night out at the cinema, but he's wrong. Sorry Mr Pacino but millions of people watch films on their mobile devices worldwide, and Video on Demand (VOD) is their preferred choice.
When catch-up TV first started gaining traction some heralded it as the death of the TV set. Why would anyone invest in a new TV set when they could watch the programme of their choice on their laptop or smartphone, and for free?
Some people argue that the end of television is nigh. They say that less and less people will watch, until television ceases to exist. I don't buy into that argument.