voluntary and community sector

Every so often and with seemingly increasing frequency, the siren voices of parts of the media and certain politicians demand that charities cease campaigning. Some of these voices actually go further and demand that the Government passes legislation to silence charities.
The closure of Kids Company over the summer was one further case study in the importance of effective charity governance
Given the current political and economic agenda, it is all too tempting for the voluntary and community sector to retreat
The outcome of the General Election has significant implications for the voluntary and community sector (VCS). At both a local and national level, it must now respond - in a constructive but principled manner.
Every charity will have its own policy agenda that it will wish to pursue, and many will (I fervently hope) have been promoting these agendas, locally and nationally, over the last few years, prior to the forthcoming general election campaign.
Rather than wait for a future government to impose new requirements the sector should develop its own transparency standards and promote their adoption by all charities.The principle should be that charities believe in transparency and will adopt exemplar practice.
The UK General Election is only four months away. This will be a very significant general election with potentially major implications for the future of the state, the economy, society and consequently for the charity and voluntary and community sector.
The charity and wider voluntary and community sector faces many challenges, most of which originate externally. However, I do fear that an unfortunate proportion (hopefully not too large a proportion)of these challenges are self-generated, and of these, it seems to me that far too many stem from within these organisations' executive and trustee leadership teams.
The voluntary and community sector faces unprecedented challenges. These challenges are deep and very significant including the withdrawal of public funding, political attacks, and increased demand for services (especially as a result of cuts to public services and the impact of austerity).
These are going to be critical months for the voluntary and community sector (VCS) and charities more generally - and this is especially the case for the national sector bodies. It will also be a critical period for all of us and there needs to be an open debate about the future of society which these bodies can lead.