voting system

It's time to bring how we vote into line with how people want to vote, to give the public a democracy that can reflect all voices, and to make every vote count. It's more clear than ever that voters have changed. Now the system needs to change too.
It's time we put paid to the awkward and unnecessary debates about 'spoiler' candidates. The way to do that is to have a voting system where it's always OK for voters to vote for their party. That, surely, is not such a radical idea.
Last week, the UK went to the polls in the biggest round of elections we'll see before 2020. The results clearly showed the difference a fair voting system makes. Local elections in England were the only contests which used an outdated, unfair system. We saw millions of people denied a strong voice on their council.
If you were following it, it was easy to get lost last week underneath the bar charts and rapid analysis of Thursday's elections - the 'winners and losers', the ups and downs. Because there were some very revealing signs of the longer term trends affecting political behaviour and future shape of the UK - and they need to be talked about.
Our voting system, First Past the Post, creates division and disunity; leaves people unrepresented and politicians unaccountable; and fosters a type of governance which is manipulative, alienating, and spiteful.
At the crux of the issue is this: multi-party politics is here to stay, but our old-fashioned two-party system can't cope with the choices of modern voters. We clearly need a much fairer voting system.
It's time politicians from all parties woke up to the need for a fairer voting system. First Past the Post is hurting our democracy - and now we've discovered it's a financial disaster, too.
More unions could soon be echoing this sentiment and pushing for PR once the TUC's research is out next year. The campaign for fair votes is only getting stronger.
Voters should be given the right to stop Britain going to war and put a halt to major controversial projects such as HS2
There is always someone who, around that time on Christmas Day night when you're so drunk you are already hungover, decides