WaterAid

Since we marked the first UN-declared World Water Day in 1993, the world has made incredible progress. Yet there remain more than 650million people in the world without access to clean water, who are faced with a daily struggle involving long dangerous walks or expensive black-market vendors, just to get water that is likely neither clean nor safe to drink.
If we are to celebrate all that women have achieved, surely this basic right, essential for health and dignity, which has held so many women and girls back from their full potential cannot go ignored.
Ebola no longer makes the headlines, driven out by news of Zika virus and the crisis in Syria. But the terrible legacy of Ebola persists in West Africa, for the survivors who suffer stigma and fear long-term complications, and for all of those who are vulnerable and in need of healthcare at a time when the health system has been brought to its knees.
As the world's decision-makers congregate in Davos this week, one of the most pressing issues will be also one of the most fundamental: Water.
Jenny Lewis' new book One Day Young, features portraits of women in their Hackney homes within 24 hours of giving birth. A few of these images are of acquaintance's, but most were stranger's at that point, all depicting an arresting intimacy and timelessness that would sit perfectly amongst the collections at The National Portrait Gallery.
On this World Toilet Day, it's time for the world to make good on our promises - and while we all love a bit of toilet humour, the state of the world's sanitation really is no joke.
Could you imagine a world where men had periods? It'd be very different to the one we live in, that's for sure. To emphasise
While Crossness Pumping Station may not feature on a postcard, it has perhaps played a bigger part in changing the lives of ordinary Londoners than any other building, saving thousands from death and disease. My great-great-great grandfather Sir Joseph Bazalgette designed and built Crossness...
Belu started with a simple idea - to transform the bottled water industry by reducing the sector's environmental impact and using 100% of its profits to fund clean water projects in the world's poorest communities. From humble beginnings, this mineral water has made a huge impact.
Every day, women around the world spend many hours walking long distances to collect clean water and provide supplies for their families. In fact, a shocking 750 million people globally - approximately one in nine people - lack access to safe water and acceptable sanitation.