WaterAid

A spate of brutal attacks on young women in India's urban centres, most recently a young woman in Calcutta who died after being gang-raped and set on fire, have drawn world attention. But thousands of other women are preyed upon at vulnerable moments, whether it's riding a bus, walking alone or, in the case of girls like Bhawna, looking for a place to relieve themselves.
Imagine you need to use the loo. Really, right now, you desperately need a loo. Now imagine you're in Uganda, one of the poorest countries on the planet. Now imagine you're in Uganda and you don't have the use of your legs. You don't have a proper wheelchair to get around with either - you use a hand-pedal bike, creaky and rusty.
Sustainability is achievable, as demonstrated during a recent trip to WaterAid programmes in drought-prone Konso, Ethiopia, where there are some exciting and innovative projects in place that are making real progress in overcoming the challenges in ensuring a lasting access to clean water.
Across the world, 1 in 3 women risk shame, disease, harassment and even attack because they have nowhere safe to go to the toilet. That's 1.25 billion women - daughters, sisters, mothers, grandmothers. Facing each day without access to this basic necessity is not just an inconvenience; it impacts on all aspects of life, and it is women and girls who suffer the most. Having nowhere safe to go to the toilet also means an increased risk of shame, harassment and even violence for women and girls when they are forced to go out in search of a private place to go to the toilet.
The key theme at this year's Stockholm World Water Week is water and food security: how do we meet the ever developing needs of a growing population with an increasing demand for resources?
Cholera is a word that fills the world's poorest people with dread, but if asked, the average person in the west would probably know little apart from what is gleaned from foreign correspondents reporting from hellish refugee camps.
This understanding that wider determinates of poverty have a big impact on the risks of mothers dying in childbirth is reinforced by evidence, not only from our own programmes but from scientific studies.
With Rio+20 on the immediate horizon, and a focus on water, energy and food, water will be an issue that world and business leaders are likely to find absorbed into their agendas - and rightly so.
This was the third time that WaterAid has been involved with the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, and we were delighted with the silver medal-winning garden that Patricia Thirion and Janet Honour created for us.
Cut through a wattle forest, the dirt track to Lupembe does not afford the visitor from Europe an easy ride. From the nearest