wealth gap

It IS good news that more British people are more prosperous and that the richest people in the world regard Britain as a safe haven and politically stable. The bad news is that growing inequality is approaching pre first world war levels. The richest 10% in Britain own 44% of total national wealth, five times more than the poorest 50% of the population who collectively own 9%.
Bankers get millions in bonuses, footballers earn thousands every week: we all know the clichés. The market says this is what they are worth, but the general public don't really believe that. Do they earn this money, really? Can anyone do a job that genuinely, demonstrably, should produce that kind of reward?
Since the global crisis of 2008 there has been much talk about the widening wealth inequality gap throughout all Western nations. This debate is most pronounced in the Anglo-Saxon countries, which uniquely amongst the developed Western economies have traditionally had the widest disparities.
The children of the 1960s and 1970s will only be better off than the previous generation when they retire due to inherited
Most of us now enjoy luxuries that would have been unheard of a hundred years ago - running water, electricity, computers, phones, cheap food and clothing. Yet, despite all this, there is discontent. People are angry.
You don't have to be a Marxist to feel a sense of outrage at these statistics. I trust that most of us with an ounce of sympathy for the suffering of fellow human beings would sense that the global economic system that engineers such disparity in the way people live is dysfunctional and requires serious reforms.
In the past 30 years, if we look at a country like the US, which can be considered the most visible democracy on earth, about 50% of the country's GDP was transferred from the bottom 90% of the taxpayers to the richest 1% of the Americans. This happened in front of everyone's eyes, in popularly elected governments and freedom of speech.
The rich populate Elysium, a satellite utopia of clean-cut modern architecture, plush gardens and universal immortality. The Secretary of Defence epitomizes the utilitarian ruler, leaving her own garden party to shoot down a few rogue immigrant shuttles.
"Do not be mistaken. There are many thousands of business leaders and investors at all scales who want to align their actions
Mr. Osborne, Britain's Chancellor, stood in the House of Commons (August 11, 2011), full of pride, to announce to the nation that "Britain is a safe haven for investors". I, for one, am not impressed, nor do I expect most of the British people are, as they struggle to survive the hardships created by the "moneymen" with their casino-type capitalism.