wealth inequality

Millennials are unlikely to attain their parents' level of wealth, report finds.
We are a wealthy but deeply unequal nation. The richest 10% of households own nearly 900 times the wealth of the poorest 10%, and five times more than the least wealthy half of the population, who own just 9% of the UK's wealth.
Once again I must ask our Government to sit up and listen. We have, in Liverpool and across the northern region, talented and gifted politicians who care about creating better conditions for all. They must be given the resources to do so.
The most uncomfortable truth lurking within this tragedy is that there is a stigma attached to people who live in social housing. Narrowly, this means that a discount is applied to their views when they are expressed to the relevant authorities. Broadly it also means that the lives and wellbeing of people who live in council blocks are seen as having less value than home owners.
The real question we should be asking is not whether vast new wealth is being created, it's whether this is a system that benefits the many, and what, on reaching such dizzying heights, we should ask of those at the top.
For the first time in my life I was standing in my power, being myself and using my innate gifts and abilities. I felt free to do what I wanted, I stopped apologising and asking for permission, and I was being rewarded for doing so. That felt good. Really good.
What sort of system have we created that relentlessly siphons wealth from the poor to the richest 1%, and in the process deprives humanity of the resources that could bring happiness, contentment and joy to billions of people? When, oh when, will world leaders take concrete steps to remedy this injustice and unfairness?
Inequality has been shown to impact on the durability of economic growth and increases the chances of future financial shocks; it undermines social cohesion and equality for women; and it increases political instability. In a surprising echo to Aicha's words, the self-proclaimed zillionaire Nick Hanauer wrote in 2014 that "if we don't do something to fix the glaring inequities in this economy, the pitchforks are going to come for us"... Economic and policy changes in recent decades - including deregulation, privatisation, financial secrecy and globalisation, especially of finance - have supercharged the age-old ability of the rich and powerful to use their position to further concentrate their wealth.
Growing inequality means a coach-load of people now own as much wealth as half the planet's population put together, a report