wedding planning advice

Ideally, wedding planning is not something you start to think about in the two months before the big day. While there are plenty of things you can sort out later down the line, you will save yourself a great deal of trouble and stress if you sort most things out now.
I know I'm not the only one grappling with this predicament. Newly engaged couples all over the world are debating whether to have their weddings at home or opting for the blissful proposition of a destination wedding. Plus for us Brits, the lure of a wedding abroad, where we may be able to guarantee some sunshine, is often even stronger. Hopefully this realistic list of pros and cons can aid those conversations...
With grooms around the world stumbling into strip clubs, being attached to street-lamps starkers or ending up in police custody during their supposed 'last night of freedom', it's fair to question whether the stag in question is having quite as much fun as his friends are. Despite being someone who is regularly up for a messy night out, I still definitely know what I do and don't want for my stag do - and I'd like to think my friends do too.
Once you've had at least five prosecco engagement celebrations and you've received too many cards to fit in your ridiculously over-priced studio flat in the outskirts of London, it's time to get serious and get a plan together. So here's seven points to help you out.
The pressure for perfection and peak Instagramable happiness has taken the Bridezilla from a reality show character to how you might describe your wedding obsessed Facebook friend. The rise of the Bridezilla and wed-stress is real and can make any sane woman (or man) go from zero to hot-mess in one engagement ring.
Everyone wants their dream venue - whether it be a church, a castle or down your local; thought, time and a whole load of money goes into securing the venue of your dreams. But what if your chosen venue doesn't want you?
A prepared bride is a calm bride. Avoid any last minute jitters and frantic trips to the convenience store on your wedding morning and pack these things well in advance. Your bag of goodies should be with you when you are getting ready...
Wedding bells are on their way out - we mere mortals should expect to hear just a faint tingle of their quaint ding-dong. Yet I, along with many others, will be donning a white dress and saying 'I do' in just under a year's time. So why, quite frankly, do we bother?
Congratulations on your engagement! I am sure you can barely contain your excitement at the prospect of getting married and planning the wedding day of your dreams. I by no means want to curtail your excitement, but I would advise a few words of caution.
Yes, before you say anything, I know some of you are engaged for more than 12 months and some of you are engaged for less, but I thought it would be easier to do a 12 month must-read essential wedding planning checklist.
I found that my planning went absolutely swimmingly until other people were involved. Namely, family. "Why isn't so and so invited? Can I have a plus one?" The simplest answer you can give is "because there is no room". In an ideal world I would have had everyone I love and like. I was limited to 160. Ergo. There were some cuts.
As a little girl, the pinnacle of my dream was to get married. The dress. The rescue. The prince. The fabulous hair. The happy ever after. It's what we were promised. But I'm 37 now, and divorced even though I had a wedding planner (although I still have fabulous hair).
Wedding readings are undoubtedly the most heinous of all ceremonial speeches. No witty irony, no jokes, not even a personal nod-and-a wink to the married couple. Just an unapologetic slurry of schmaltzy cliches that wade knee-deep through a syrup of every single balk-inducing stereotype the English language has ever been able to muster.
You will save yourself a whole heap of wedding day stress by letting go. Turn up, get married, have a party. Don't worry about the details or the politics. Don't stress about things running on time because they never do. Ever.