wheelchair-accessible

I have recently been to Torino, in the north west Italy, and I pleasantly discovered that it is a city that has chosen to dismantle many of those insurmountable barriers; thus becoming one of Italy's favourite destination of tourism for the disabled.
I won't give up campaigning for my child to have the basic human right of access to a toilet when we're out and about. Why should he be excluded? Why shouldn't our family be welcomed everywhere like all other families?
Manchester United are set to reduce the capacity of Old Trafford by 2,400 to allow works to be completed to meet minimum standards for disabled fans.
When people pick up the bill at a restaurant I want them to clock the disabled access and loo, then tell everyone about it. I am optimistic that many, when choosing where to buy their lunch, will settle on the sandwich chain which a map, or possibly an app, says has committed to providing disabled access in all its outlets. By enabling consumers to make these choices we will speed up the pace of change.
The spaces on buses wouldn't be there if disabled campaigners hadn't fought for them to be there in the 1980s and 1990s. But today many wheelchair users still face difficulties accessing the spaces, often causing a great deal of distress.
It's not just the Premier League where this is an issue. Only 10% of shopping centres have a Changing Places toilet, only 13% if motorway service stations have one, and a pitiful 0.004% of train stations have one. So what are we doing about it?
Today, Sense publishes a new report highlighting the health inequalities and barriers facing deafblind people accessing healthcare. It comes ahead of the implementation of the Accessible Information Standard on July 31st, and stresses the urgent need for all health and social care providers to deliver a more accessible service for patients with sensory loss.
For a few months Kasia, her brothers crew in Peterborough and her parents in Poland were planning a 2 week holiday in the sun. With access, finances and children to consider - it proved tricky to arrange.
As many in my generation will have experienced, I left high school full of self-doubt and confusion about my future. I certainly didn't have a plan about what to do with my life and the idea of running my own business seemed completely alien to me. The only thing I was sure about is that I wanted to improve my English. So at a young age I took the plunge and moved from my hometown in Italy to the capital of the UK, full of nerves and anticipation for my future.
This week saw the launch of Muscular Dystrophy UK's latest report, 'Breaking Point', which examined to what extent housing
Over the past 30 years racism and homophobia have been tackled with great success, but individuals with disabilities are still discriminated against by companies and society as a whole, why?