wheelchairs

When people pick up the bill at a restaurant I want them to clock the disabled access and loo, then tell everyone about it. I am optimistic that many, when choosing where to buy their lunch, will settle on the sandwich chain which a map, or possibly an app, says has committed to providing disabled access in all its outlets. By enabling consumers to make these choices we will speed up the pace of change.
The spaces on buses wouldn't be there if disabled campaigners hadn't fought for them to be there in the 1980s and 1990s. But today many wheelchair users still face difficulties accessing the spaces, often causing a great deal of distress.
As the Tube strike hits London and commuters complain of travel chaos, this infographic reminds us of the pitiful access
I know this article is going to sound emotive, and I make no apologies for that as when I believe in something, it tends to be all or nothing.
Well I have just taken delivery of a wheelchair on a temporary basis as I have had an ankle ligament repair and arthroscopy to my ankle, so no weight bearing for 2 months. I have just spent 20 minutes in the garden in said wheelchair that has just been delivered, and wow what an experience.
Over the past 30 years racism and homophobia have been tackled with great success, but individuals with disabilities are still discriminated against by companies and society as a whole, why?
Today, I bump into the edges of doorways. While stretching to pick up one thing, I manage to drop several others. I reverse into tables. I crash into entrances and misjudge distances. There is so much to learn about wheelchairs. I cannot think where to start.
We ended up visiting several different car showrooms (whose names I shall discreetly refrain from mentioning) but size and shape can be highly deceiving, and many cars we saw, at first glance appeared spacious, until we tried to fit my wheelchair in the boot.