wife

I have lay-ins on weekends. I make sure I am the one who tends to our babes at night, every night, since their births. I let my husband sleep. I make dinner, he makes dinner, sometimes one of us does more, the other does something different. We are always doing something of value to add to our family.
I am lucky that I had my husband and kids to keep me going, along with the confidence to go out to meet other people in the civilian world to talk about my work and gather some support. Others aren't so lucky, and these are the people I really worry about.
We're both doing okay. We have enough stuff, and isn't Christmas a time for giving to those less fortunate? Even if it isn't officially, it feels like it should be. There are so many people who need presents more than I do, or she does.
Most people have seen the spectacular fall-out from divorce cases between one impossibly-wealthy person and another, normally with the upshot that one tries to wring as much out of the other as their lawyers can muster. All of which makes for great headlines, but it's not usually an accurate reflection of most divorce settlements.
Over the past month or so I have noticed a trend emerging. More and more of us are feeling down about our parenting skills- more specifically us mothers are feeling like we are failing our children.
A long time ago, there were two ladies who became friends, whilst waiting for appointments at their local doctors surgery. Both were expecting babies, and they just hit it off....You know when two people meet and suddenly you become friends for life, this is what happened to them.
If you were one of the lucky couples to get engaged over Valentine's Day weekend, congratulations! This is a special and exciting time, and no doubt thoughts of engagement parties and wedding preparations are already providing hours of anticipation and joy.
She called herself a "prize" to Dad, something which he has "won" and that I should think myself as a "prize" in my relationships, too. Whilst she wore this label like a badge of honour and saw it as some kind of compliment, I found being called a prize just as offensive had someone called me a sack of sh*t.
It's been uttered a gazillion times by men across the globe and now it looks like the expression "happy wife, happy life
Wedding bells are on their way out - we mere mortals should expect to hear just a faint tingle of their quaint ding-dong. Yet I, along with many others, will be donning a white dress and saying 'I do' in just under a year's time. So why, quite frankly, do we bother?