wild food

Rhubarb crumble is a well tried and tested pudding and stem ginger is an interesting addition in a fool or jam . Historically, the herb sweet cicely was cooked with rhubarb. The clue is in its name; sweet cicely conquers the tartness of the rhubarb plant
Nothing says Springtime like a posy of flowers. After the seemingly endless grey of winter, early Spring flowers are a welcome splash of colour and life. They look almost good enough to eat. Which is handy. Because with many of them, you can. So hurrah for edible flowers.
Spring in Britain can be an icy affair but I am always cheered by the bright crimson stems of young rhubarb even its red contrasts the white of snow, as it did recently. Beyond the garden you'll find rhubarb in country lanes and if you are fortunate, you may spy sweet cicely Myrrhis odorata too.
This is an easy and pretty flexible recipe. No nettles? Use all spinach. No wild garlic? Just use one small clove of bulb garlic. And of course use any deeply flavoured mushroom rather than porcini - but if you do you will miss out on the deep umami notes that porcini brings to this.
It's a fast growing tree so this will appease those with an eco conscience. America in my opinion does Christmas rather splendidly, be it decorations, films or Nat King Cole in song, roasting chestnuts over an open fire.
Like a lot of Brits I'm leery about picking wild mushrooms. Hedgerow fruit, no problem. Wild garlic, absolutely. But in spite of the fact that I often picked field mushrooms with my dad when I was a child, I'm funny about funghi. Too many Agatha Christie novels at a formative age, perhaps, along with a yawning gap of ignorance...
With foraging schools popping up like mushrooms and wild ingredients creeping into the menus of some of the country’s leading
Hotchpotch Seaweed Sourdough Porphyra spp. or laver is a red seaweed. Although, when you spy laver on rocks, it may look
I call the lochan by the supermarket of the Isle, Lily Loch. It never ceases to amaze me that such an exotic water plant can clog up Uist ditches and lochs. On a day when the sun shines, a lily clad lochan is heart lifting even in the breezy Outer Hebridean wind.
Where do you stand on using foraged foods in cooking? Whether you are completely new to foraging or a foraging enthusiast, sometimes taking home some carefully-picked edible wild plants (and after even more careful identification), the question is: how to use foraging plants in cooking?