wild garlic

The countryside in spring brings to mind Hardy's story of Tess of the d'Urbervilles and the concern that the butter had a funny twang as a result of the cows having dined on the leaves of wild garlic - wild garlic has both wild scent and a pungent flavour.
Foragers can have a lean time of it over the cold winter months but as the days lengthen, and we hear the distinctive song of the skylark as it hoovers in flight, the forager can fill his or her basket with buds and wild spring greens. The March wind may blow but wild garlic works as well in a dumpling as a sushi style wrap.
After three weeks of pickings we've yet to tire of cooking with wild garlic. In honesty it's a joy to any lazy cook who loathes messing about with the papery skin which encases cloves of garlic.
Wild garlic is peeping up amongst the snowdrops in the woods behind our Angus house. When the cattle return to a ajoining woodland field, it always brings a smile to my face as I am minded of the tainted butter in Hardy's tale of Tess of the D'Urbervilles.