Wildlife conservation

Anytime there is a picture of a game hunter with a lion, the internet blows up with well-meaning, but ultimately wrong-headed reactions. Some of the more disgusting commentary threatens violence against humans.
There are Resident Orcas which are the most commonly seen in the Pacific East. They travel in strong, cohesive family pods and eat mainly fish but on occasion squid. They are creatures of habit and visit the same locations continuously.
After two years, the government's own results clearly show the pilot culls have failed to deliver on either effectiveness or humaneness.
If this pint-sized porpoise does become extinct, it means that we will have discovered and exterminated the smallest of the cetaceans in less than a human lifetime. Its imperilled status has long been of concern and its main threat well established as incidental capture in fishing nets, sometimes called 'bycatch'.
With an estimated worth of between 10 and 20 billion dollars each year, the "zero tolerance approach to wildlife trafficking" announced by HRH Prince William in Washington this week is so very welcome.
The annual Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition is now in its fiftieth year. It is a global showcase of the very best nature photographs and I was absolutely blown away by the finalists on show in a stunning and moving display of their work at the Natural History Museum.
What does it means to be a responsible tourist and why someone should consider their trip from an environmental perspective, and try to ensure what they do abroad and how they get there is sustainable?
I consider my relationship with nature as a long and unfolding conversation, like learning a language that I can never master. And this conversation is never dull. Like most discourses, it only improves with time and age, to reach a point where a constant connection evolves and grows, with almost daily realisations.
There was a time when the fight to save the whales was at the forefront of environmental concerns. Sadly, this is no longer true and, as we approach the next meeting of the International Whaling Commission a little later this month, it is worth reflecting on the dilemmas now facing those who continue to oppose whaling for profit.
It took me a week to get used to the environment, as even though I liked the food, I struggled to eat much, though I soon got my appetite back to its usual size once I had adjusted to the climate and my malaria pills. Anyway despite my lack of energy I still enjoyed the quick intro into PADI (I found that I was at a slight advantage as I had already started working through the book).