women and work

While it hasn't always been easy, I have learnt an enormous amount during the last two years and I hope the following tips will help inspire other mothers who may be considering a return to work in 2017.
We hear a lot about the injustices woman face in modern Britain, not least in the form of the gender pay gap. An IFS report earlier this year captured the spotlight as it spelled it out in cold, hard statistics how the pay gap between men and women grows after having children, leading to stalled career progression. But a story less often told is how women at the bottom end of the labour market are carrying the heavier burden of poverty in our society. Figures released by JRF as part of the BBC's 100 Women highlight this reality. A fifth of women - around 5.1million - live in poverty in the UK, compared to 4.4million men.
While a nerve-wracking experience for some, networking at events can garner useful business connections, though you'll need to be equipped with more than a good handshake. I've gathered some pointers together based on experience (the good, the bad and the ugly) in the hope they will help prevent networking opportunities from feeling like the first day of school - again.
You are almost certainly well-educated, quite possibly with a university degree that has equipped you with an excellent foundation of knowledge and skills - theoretically that's a pretty good starting point
I've been talking for some time about the changing world of work, and how traditional working life patterns of employment and doing business are increasingly less relevant in today's workplace. A combination of economics, technology and changing attitudes is forcing change upon us, like it or not.
Paul's worked in a men's clothing wholesalers, but his real passion was cycling and he hoped to be a professional racing cyclist. When he was 17, he had an accident that put an end to this ambition. While in hospital, he made friends with some 'arty types' and his life had just taken him in an entirely new and unexpected direction.
Gossip, especially gossip at work, is generally considered a bad thing. While it’s hard to deny that few catty words shared
The career advice that they are given at these events from strong successful women often centres around learning what gets the attention of male bosses, competing in a mans world and being more confident. This is all sound advice and may even help you to be viewed as one of the boys, but is that what we really want?
Troubled mining giant Anglo American announced its chief executive, Cynthia Carroll, is to step down from her role as chief