women of the future

Women do not shout loud enough about their achievements. Across all areas of life, women are breaking new boundaries and this needs celebrating. We need to highlight what women are achieving to show that everyone has the opportunity to be successful.
In order to be a successful businesswomen in this male-dominated world, I believe confidence is key. Not only to success, but to happiness. I am much happier with myself today as I have confidence in what I do. Over my life, I have learned so much and I was lucky enough to have a fantastic mentor - my mother.
When you're simply following your passions, you never do so expecting to be awarded for it. Of course, I delight in a sense of accomplishment from my efforts and even more so when I'm rewarded for them however formal recognition was never really on the agenda.
I also am extremely thrilled to have been part of the panel judging Professional of the Year. Sarah Pierce was such a worthy winner. She is making such an impact on so many lives both within her career but also personally, with talent, energy, grace passion and a smile!
I dreamed of making world's first pure metal computer based on GMR technology. I dreamed of making a quantum computer that can have billions of times computing power as our desktop PCs.
As I trawl through my Russian grammar books, revelling in the complexities of the perfective and imperfective case, deciphering letters that look more like variations of stick men and desperately try not to sound like a Welshman when speaking the language, I take a moment to remember "Dare 2 B Different" and consider its future successes.
Growing up, I was fascinated with computers and gaming, mostly due to encouragement from my parents who saw computing as being an increasingly relevant skill to learn. However, the only famous individuals in tech that I knew about were men like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs. As a child I felt that it was strange that I was interested in computers, probably because I had no role models to look up to.
It is more than 30 years since women were granted the right to equal pay in the UK and it is generally accepted that there is still more work to be done to redress thousands of years of imbalance
Without becoming too tangential to the centre of my discussion, I want to briefly identify that this is not a diatribe against Holly Willoughby, against somebody who is doing their job as a television personality, but rather she features since she is part of the show and thus, playing "the only game that exists."
When I was recently asked to speak at the annual Women of the Future Ambassadors event, I immediately knew I had quite a task on my hands. Being told I'm a 'role model' is one thing but actually getting up and offering guidance to the young ladies of tomorrow is quite another.