Women's Equality Party

The internet and organisations like WEP can play a positive role by nudging established parties and the traditional political structures into opening up to modern ways of working. The next generation of activists wants their politics to be fast, open and effective - and there are massive electoral rewards ahead for the politicians who can capture that territory...
My brief tenure as a founding member, and contributor to policy development, of the Women's Equality Party (or WEP) is, I
I'm not naive enough to believe that joining a political party solves everything, and I don't think that my WEP membership card is a magic wand that will make the patriarchy disappear in a cloud of feminist glitter. This certainly isn't the only step I'm going to take towards making my feminism more active. But it's a bloody good place to start, and I cannot wait to be a part of the amazing things I know WEP will achieve.
At the age of seven I was subjected to female genital mutilation (FGM). This did not happen because I was African or Muslim, but because I was female. I came back from that summer trip to Somalia to continue to live in the United Kingdom. By the age of 11, I had worked out that FGM was rooted in patriarchy and assumed that those tasked with leading this country would recognise this too, and care enough to protect girls like me. I also assumed that by the time I grew up I would be paid equally to men and be able to have a baby without affecting my career. But the older I got the more I lost faith that - without radical change - this equality would be something I would ever actually experience.
Sophie Walker, the leader of the new Women’s Equality Party, says she wants to change the perception of politics as "white
On 15th June, 800 years ago the unpopular King John met with his unruly Barons at Runnymede to sign Magna Carta...
If we really care about ending violence against women, we have to listen to all women. I only hope the Women's Equality Party bears that in mind. Realising the limitations and inaccuracies of the phrase 'both sexes' would be a good starting point.
Sandi Toksvig, the comic who hosted BBC Radio 4's The News Quiz for nine years, has revealed she quit the show to help set