women's fitness

Team SCA has now been racing since the beginning of October last year, and we are now approximately half way through the fourth leg from Sanya, China, to Auckland, the "city of sails" in New Zealand. It's day 15 and we still have one more gruelling week to go.
A 24 hour cycle as part of Team SCA is quite unlike anything I have experienced before. Our 24 hours aren't split clearly into day and night like everybody else's - we instead live as part of a constant process, a finely tuned sailing system, which moves in four-hour sprints.
It makes you think about how easy it is to let the tap running without really thinking about what a luxury it is. The unlimited access of clean fresh water is probably one of the things I miss most out here. And with that said it´s time to pull myself together and make that evening tea!
This north-south leg from Sanya to the 'city of Sails' in Auckland has so far delivered everything you could hope for, and expect, from the toughest ocean race in the world. Life on board has been pretty much full-on since the start and I'm amazed at how the whole crew accept, handle and deal with every situation that is thrown at them. ..
After three exciting legs in the Volo Ocean Race as part of Team SCA, I will be taking a back-seat on the next leg, passing the baton to my colleague Anna-Lena.
There was no better day for me to start the Volvo Ocean Race. After three legs of watching my team mates race from the shore, I've been itching for my turn to join them on the Volvo 65 - though after going through everything with Corinna (my fellow Onboard Reporter), it was sad to wave goodbye as we left Sanya...
Sailing to the Eastern world has been a bit surreal. When you're out there, offshore, you're in a bubble--you know you're moving and racing to some place new, but it's not like traveling on an aeroplane. Travel by air takes hours, not weeks, so when you arrive in a new place it's generally not as over whelming.
The Malacca Straits are famous as one of the largest areas for shipping in the world--80% of the world's oil travels through the Straits.
Despite a less than comfortable life down below, we're all pretty excited for the next couple of days. Around 2100 tonight we're due to reach the top of Sumatra (finally!) and begin our journey through the Malacca Straits. The Malacca Straits are like a busy marine highway and we have a narrow path to scoot through, which also includes fishing boats and shallow waters.
As we sail together across the largest Bay in the world, it is very apparent that no sea is too big to cross and no mountain is too tall to climb--our sense of adventure and our communal love for racing are at the heart of our story.