workshops

Back in 2010, I would never have predicted that when my friend, Brian Greenley, was diagnosed with bowel cancer, the letters that I offered to write to him would change both our lives... The letters began and over the next two years, as Brian's cancer developed to stage four, I kept on writing.
Every parent is a great parent. It isn't fair that education can make parents feel insecure. We need to ensure that we are bridging this gap and looking at viable opportunities that parents can take advantage of.
Each and every one of us is connected to that universal energy which guides us, if we are willing to be quiet and listen to it through meditation. In this fast-paced over-technicalised world meditation is my little oasis in the day where I can release any stress.
Yesterday I returned to Manchester after four days at Wilderness Festival in Oxfordshire. Wilderness, for those of you who
I warmly recommend this approach for working positively with tensions at work and in life. It can really help to bring the needs of self and others into balance and create coherence between our inner beliefs and outward behaviour.
The one thing that running a business has taught me is that things are never constant. Things are never permanent. You cannot separate the highs and lows or have one without the other, so you must learn to accept the process and understand that it's part of the journey.
Recent research from the 2015 Pets at Home Pet Report revealed that rabbits are the third most popular choice of pet for British children* and owning rabbits has proven benefits for them. In the study 72% of parents agreed that owning a pet has helped with their child's anxiety. In fact, rabbit owners in particular (60%) said that their child had become more responsible and 57% of parents also said they had seen an improvement in their children's learning difficulties since getting rabbits.
One of the greatest joys of being a knitter is passing on your skills to other people, although I have to admit it took me nearly 40 years before I felt I had enough skills to teach anyone else.
It is a very personal journey to make your own mask and I have seen a pattern emerge over the years of observing people make their totem piece - the mask takes form and then the maker cannot help but reveal a part of themselves through the design, build and decoration.
I get called a lot of things by taxidermy enthusiasts, animal-rights activists, and the media. I'm apparently an instructor, an expert, a hipster, an animal hater, a sicko, a stuffer...but one of the most puzzling things I have been called recently is a "woman taxidermist" and I get asked the same question time and time again "Why are so many women taking up taxidermy classes?".