world health assembly

This started way before President Trump and will likely continue long after him.
'The equivalent of at least two large schools is emptied of children each and every day.'
A lack of belief in the legitimacy of the WHO is a big problem for the success of the Health Emergencies Programme and the future of the institution. Unless member states such as the UK believe that the WHO has the legitimacy and ability to act in response to health emergencies, funding for ambitious life-saving programmes will not be forthcoming and the WHO will remain an institution of must-dos without action.
The 69th World Health Assembly (WHA) next week will see all eyes on the WHO again after a turbulent couple of years. Condemned for its failings in the global response to Ebola, stuck in a process of reform that everyone agrees is needed but no-one knows how, and on the brink of declaring yellow fever a public health emergency of international concern, things are hotting up for the election of the new Director General.
Talented health professionals from across the world are our greatest hope for realising the universal right to health in an increasingly challenging world. For this to happen, equitable access to global health training is essential. For if WHO is to be a truly global guardian of health, its workforce, and thus its interns, must be global too.
We are calling for a post-2015 framework that is supported by ambitious financing commitments and mechanisms that will ensure those most affected by poverty, such as those living in communities at risk from NTDs, have dramatically improved access to basic services (health, education, water, sanitation and social protection), employment and livelihoods prospects and enjoy their political and civic rights.
Our generation can be proud of what is being achieved across global development - and the malaria fight is the poster child for what has been done and what could be. In the first half of the twenty first century there is the possibility of the eradication of the biggest disease in human history.
In just a few months' time, the world will agree on a new set of global development goals which are expected to be more ambitious, more rights-based and more sustainable than the preceding Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
Nutrition is both a maker and marker of development. Yet, undernutrition continues to hamper the ability of children to live happy, healthy lives and reach their full potential. Millions of children - 52 million to be exact - suffer from acute malnutrition.
That said, we have to remember that while money is necessary, it is not sufficient on it's own to tackle undernutrition. Last year was also an opportunity to share best practices, learn from each others successes and share new innovations that could bolster nutrition efforts.